What’s in a Name? Part 2

Teaching a child how to write his or her name is not only a writing activity.  When you think about it, there are many different activities that can be done with names.  The video called “Early Childhood Education: Constructive Learning Environments” in the previous post “What is in a Name? Part 1”, gave many examples. By varying the type of activities, each central domain may be integrated into the learning plan.

The following are the domains and goals that are met through activities related to the names of the children in the classroom.

APPROACHES TO LEARNING: EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL SELF-REGULATION

  • Child follows classroom rules and routines with increasing independence.
  • Child appropriately handles and takes care of classroom materials.
  • Child maintains focus and sustains attention with minimal adult support.
  • Child persists in tasks
  • Child holds information in mind and manipulates it to perform tasks.

APPROACHES TO LEARNING: INITIATIVE AND CURIOSITY

  • Child demonstrates initiative and independence.
  • Child shows interest in and curiosity about the world around them.

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL: SENSE OF IDENTITY AND BELONGING

  • Child expresses confidence in own skills and positive feelings about self

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL: SENSE OF IDENTITY AND BELONGING

  • Child shows confidence in own abilities through relationships with others.

LITERACY:  PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS

  • Child demonstrates awareness that spoken language is composed of smaller segments of sound

LITERACY: PRINT AND ALPHABET KNOWLEDGE

  • Child demonstrates an understanding of how print is used (functions of print) and the rules that govern how print works (conventions of print).

LITERACY: PRINT AND ALPHABET KNOWLEDGE

  • Child identifies letters of the alphabet and produces correct sounds associated with letters.

LITERACY:  WRITING

  • Child writes for a variety of purposes using increasingly sophisticated marks.

COGNITION:  MATH (i.e. counting the letters in each child’s name)

  • Child compares numbers. (number of letters in their names).
  • Child understands simple patterns.
  • Child measures objects by their various attributes using standard and non-standard. measurement. Uses differences in attributes to make comparisons.
  • Child identifies, describes, compares, and composes shapes.

COGNITION:  SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY (i.e. compare the number of letters in each child’s name)

  • Child compares and categorizes observable phenomena.

PERCEPTUAL, MOTOR, AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT: FINE MOTOR

  • Child demonstrates control, strength, and coordination of large muscles.
  • Child uses perceptual information to guide motions and interactions with objects and other people.
  • Child demonstrates increasing control, strength, and coordination of small

Activities related to children’s names is motivating for children.  It helps a child feel good about herself as an individual, develop more confidence while learning how to write. A creative teacher will be intentional about teaching names while incorporating several domains and goals to support the children in their learning.

Advertisements

About mosaic4learning

I am Child Development Professional experience in training and Professional Development. I have presented at Pre-Service or In-Service for Head Start Programs, Child Care Centers and Preschools. Presentations include, but not limited to Shaken Baby Syndrome Prevention, Dual Language Learners in ECE, Cultural Diversity, and Inclusion. C.L.A.S.S. Certified Observer (Preschool) Environmental Rating Scales (ITERS, ECERS) Professional Development Specialist for Child Development Associate (CDA)
This entry was posted in School Readiness. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s